jump to navigation

Business Bloggers Creed October 29, 2006

Posted by electrica in blog business tools, blog debate, blogocombat, CEO blogs, deep blogology, ecommerce blogs, Miserably Servile Customer Pampering, Visionary Leadership.
add a comment

Here’s my newly polished, never publicly revealed, and rather robust Business Bloggers Creed:

I will never use a blog for anything other than web-based communication and online community formation, for the benefit of the audience and not my company.

I understand that to step into blogging with my old clunky MBA Business As Usual mentality, is to be wearing the wrong pair of ideological shoes. I accept the fact that to blog is to transform my company’s internal culture and external presentation as a whole.

I submit to the truth that a blog cannot be an isolated experiment, it must come from a deep need and necessity to connect candidly with customers, and care for their needs.

I surrender to the judgment of my customers. If they think something sucks, then it sucks. No matter what I’d prefer to think, no matter what management tells me, no matter what my colleagues say. I promise to exalt the user over the muser, the consumer over the marketer, and the customer over the internal culture and structure.

I will help customers gain deep expertise on the products we sell and the environment in which those products are, or can be, used.

I will not attempt to pervert a blog into acting as a Business As Usual advertising, sales, or multi-level marketing machine.

I will talk more about other bloggers and business writers than I do about myself. I will put my mentors and role models in the spotlight, and be very low key and shy about my own expertise, services for sale, and client project work.

I will never display sleazy links or dubious ads, such as online gambling sites, pharmaceuticals, real estate loans, discount software, erectile misogyny dysfunction, or other typical scumbag

I will blog only about what I personally, genuinely care about.

I will never write a post with the ulterior motive of purely seeking to boost traffic, as in opportunistic topic selection, or superficial pretence of relevant substance.

I will never promote a product with paid enthusiasm.

I will never rant about things about which I don’t know shit.

I will never kiss the ass of the MSM or, in a deluded state of grandiose ego, think I need mainstream journalists for any purpose, least of all “media attention”. I don’t need corpses to clap their hands for me.

I will always side with the blogosphere against any MSM or corporate accusations.

I will only attack ideas I see as harmful, counter-productive, misanthropic, or deceptive. I will try not to attack the persons holding and advancing these errors, unless they relentlessly attack me personally. Then, I won’t fight back, I’ll simply and swiftly destroy.

I will never attack a person as a person, but will pit text against text. Even if my favorite mentor and role model says something stupid or destructive, my words will move out and defend the truth, without the slightest care about damaging a friendship.

When it comes to truth, I have no friends. I will speak my mind about anything and anybody at any time, and I can never be persuaded or constrained to do otherwise.

I will bite the hand that feeds me, if it feeds me a line of bullshit.

I will never attack my loyal allies publicly, but only send a discreet email, when I think they’ve done or said something wrong.

I will attack anything or anybody, as I see fit, with no fear and no emotional hysteria or personal animosity.

I will strive for harmony, cooperation, diversity, freedom, and compassion in the beloved blogosphere that gives us all a level playing field in terms of communication and networked interactivity.

I will be constantly strive to improve, enhance, and perfect my blog.

I will share my expertise on blogging, my product field, my personal interests, and my hobbies, with all who seek it.

I will interact with everyone equally, giving no preference to those considered wealthy, successful, or celebrities. I judge “wealth”, “success”, and “celebrity” in far different terms than the world does. I am a blogger of immaterialism and inner riches.

I will not abandon or forsake my blog, unless I have tried everything in my power to avoid quitting, but life pressures force me to do so.

I will not post material to my blog, and ignore the other bloggers out there. I will gladly and abundantly post relevant, substantial, amusing comments at as many other blogs as possible. That way, I am enriching other blogs, while coincidentally possibly attracting others to my own blog, but my primary goal is to help others succeed.

I will seek out new blogs to enjoy, and encourage new bloggers to press on to the promised land.

I will try to always be inspiring, brazen, self-confident in the pursuit of noble ideals.

I will use my blog, not to push my company, not to hype my products, but to help others solve problems, succeed in work, and enjoy a lifestyle.

I will blog because I believe in human equality, freedom, and community.

I will blog because I want to help, not because I want a narcissistic platform for personal or professional vanity and exhibitionism, or simply because it’s “cool” or “mission critical”.

I will practice and proclaim the blogo-gospel of the 9 Core Values of Blogging, Absolute Switched On User Empowerment, Universal Content Utopic, and Global Democracy Revolution.

CEOs and blogocombat: an introduction August 8, 2006

Posted by electrica in basic blogology, blog debate, blogocombat, CEO blogs, CEO Videos, deep blogology, Video Blogging.
add a comment

As a hardcore blogger and web consultant, I have to engage in a variety of online debate. I call it “blogocombat”, even when I enter discussions in phone conversations or email. This contending for a point of view or set of facts is mandatory behavior. You cannot forge into the future with a paranoid or passive attitude. You must be aggressive.

But how aggressive? In what styles?

A CEO cannot do his or her company any favor by appearing to be a wimp, chump, or weakling online. The opposite extreme would be a bellicose bully, an arrogant jerk who pummels anyone who comes close.

The best, and perhaps only, way to master diplomatic but strong online debate is to spend some time observing the seasoned pros who already have the battle scars and missing limbs to prove they are veterans of the digital realm wars.

There are controversies galore in the blogosphere and vlogosphere. Google a few search terms like Net Neutrality, Comment Moderation, Fictional Character Blogs, or any aspect of blogging you are interested in right now. See what kinds of argumentation are going on, for you will surely see web pages with confrontational titles.

Watch how Mark Cuban, Seth Godin, Richard Edelman, Shel Israel, Tom Peters, or Robert Scoble respond to harsh critique, unfair assumption, and wild accusation. Study their tone and word choice. Watch how often they jump into heated discussions within their blogs or at the blogs of others.

Some say a blog is a party that anyone can join and do whatever they want. Others caution us that a blog is a livingroom of a home, and you better be polite, civil, and calm. I think CEO blogs must be prepared for intelligent, sophisticated criticism as well as more emotional, less dignified attack.

Don’t shy away from the blogosphere, due to fear of flamers.

Show courage and visionary leadership, a credibility based on brave experimentation, by juming into the blogosphere, come what may. The simple act of just starting a blog will be seen by many in your industry as being forward thinking and technologically savvy.

Better yet, start a vlog or video blog.

I’ll try posting a couple of my better videos here, as an example. Most of my video experiments are failures, but I have a fine comedy video and a neat professional instruction film on CEO video blogging.

CEO blogs, risk, failure August 6, 2006

Posted by electrica in basic blogology, CEO blogs, deep blogology, Uncategorized.
add a comment

A CEO must be cautious and visionary, modest and inspiring, transparent and trustworthy.

As a CEO looks at the blogging phenomenon and the blogosphere, what should be the verdict? To many CEOs, blogging seems “too risky”, “time-consuming”, “vulnerability hole”, “pipeline to lunacy”, “imprudent exposure”, i.e., blogging is a bad idea.

But most CEOs stand to realize tremendous benefits from candid, courageous, controversial blogging.

“Life is always a series of ups and downs, triumphs and failures. You may be successful if your triumphs simply outnumber your failures. But, in order to be successful, you must experience those failures and you must learn from them.”

— Erroll B. Davis, Jr., Chairman, President & CEO, Alliant Energy. (Wisdom for a Young CEO, Douglas Barry, Running Press 2004, p. 40)

CEOs need not fear blogging, any more than the telephone when it was first invented.

Why fear your voice will not sound strong and authoritative, in a blog or on a phone? Why fear a blog will make you look bad, when you are comfortable on television and video conferencing? Why fear to write a blog, when it’s much the same as composing email?

Why fear you will interact with bizarre trouble-makers? Your sales and service staff deal with such annoyances every day. Your cashiers and IT guys confront unexpected kooks as a standard routine, and have much they could tell you.

Now, blogs and videocasting are your opportunity to take a calculated risk, and enjoy the lessons of failure or the glory of success.

Either way, you win.

Cascading Project Proliferation. transparent CEO blogging. August 5, 2006

Posted by electrica in blog evaluation, CEO blogs, deep blogology, Discrete Strategic Transparency, Miserably Servile Customer Pampering, Personal Blogging, Uncategorized.
add a comment

A CEO blogger speaks recently of self-assigned chores that seem to somehow expand as they are pursued. Like the “fix it” mode goes berserk. Perfectionism kicks in. Work ethic obsession outbursts persist in the new dimension of infinite sequence chains massively self-propagating eternally.

The industrial managerial psychologists have a word for this, “cascading project proliferation” or “autonomous task sprawl” or “retroflexive recursive feedback entropy  syndrome” or “dynamic loop psychosis”.

Neologisms, tools with which to handle these nearly ineffable realities of life.

This type of sleeves rolled up, jacket off, deck shoes commentary on personal life, mixed with business insight or better, philosophical questions, is my favorite type of candid blogging.

There is a power in discrete transparency, and it’s euphoric.

The way it works is:

(1) You are bothered by, or pensively contemplative toward, an item.

(2) You briefly mention in your blog how it annoyed or impeded you. This is a quick connect with common folk via customized anecdote.

(3) You then build an abrupt bridge, connecting the complaint or observation with a broader business reality or practice.

(4) You demonstrate that the business and personal realms can mesh, to the productive gain of both your organization and your audience, as they benefit from a humanized real life example of a difficult to grasp or esoteric principle of business.

It’s what I call Discrete Strategic Transparency. As opposed to reckless, indiscriminate gushing of private, trivial, and inappropriate details. A “need to know” basis. A controlled revelation of personal details, with a larger objective in view.

Discrete Strategic Transparency enhances the credibility and persuasive power of a blog, by helping readers to relate to you as a regular individual with good insights and astonishing brevity of narrative.

atomic unit of the web: from site to page to tag? July 30, 2006

Posted by electrica in basic blogology, blog business tools, deep blogology, information architecture, tagging, web usability.
add a comment

Jakob Nielsen once said, in his Designing Web Usability book, that the atomic unit, the smallest coherent unit of the web was the web page.

At first, people linked to static, or infrequently updated, web sites. Then, as web sites became more complex, requiring site maps, site indexes, and clearly, relevantly labeled tabs, the exact page of a site grew in importance.

Weblogs made linking even more page oriented, with frequent posting on more varied topics. While site search and sidebar post categories were a step in the right direction, they were often unsatisfactory, hit or miss, and time-consuming.

We link, ideally, in most cases, to a specific post we are quoting, rather than to thehome page of a site. Linking to the site’s main index or home page forces the user to navigate to the specific page containing the quote or image or whatever is being referenced. This enables users to go immediately to the specific information, audio, video, photo, or art image we want them to check out.

This is why hardcore bloggers will keep a notebook with post URLs (web addresses) for each post they publish.

Now, tagging each post is all the rage, especially for what is called Web 2.0 designers and advocates. Adding tags to posts is a way to provide a context or keyword identification of a post’s content, prior to actually reading the post. Tags also enable users to see other posts, at other sites, that are tagged with the same words, thus, hopefully, relevant to the same topic.

Many problems arise with tagging. You rely on the honesty and intelligence of the site author who adds a tag or tags to a post. Plus, who knows how relevant and information-rich the posts are going to be, the posts all tagged with a specific word?

Worse yet, and you can see this in YouTube as an example, some sites that you provide content to will not have a good tagging system.

What I mean is this: say you want to tag a post “vaspers the grate”. If the site tells you that the tags must be separated by commas, or put in quotes, you’re alright. You can type in the tags “vaspers the grate, web usability analysis, blogology” (excluding the quotes) for example. Or just “vaspers the grate” (in quotes).

But wait. At some sites, like YouTube (and I’m not picking on them), your tags can be only one word. That’s why my own videos are tagged “CEOblogs” and “vaspers”, rather than “CEO blogs” and “vaspers the grate” (excluding quotes). Because the tag “CEO blogs” are two words, two separate tags, “CEO” and “blogs”, and NOT “CEO blogs”.

This distinction becomes absurd with something like “vaspers the grate” (excluding quotes) as a tag. The tags, plural, become “vaspers”, “the”, and “grate”. I jam two or three words together, as a workaround.

How to make a New Super Blog for Web 2.0 March 9, 2006

Posted by electrica in basic blogology, blog business tools, CEO blogs, deep blogology, ecommerce blogs.
1 comment so far

(1) Focus & Expand: get a dominant purpose, but go off on interesting or instructive tangents to keep readers in suspence and to spice up with exotic flavors that make you *memorable* and eminently *re-visitable*, perhaps even blogrollable and RSS/Atom feed subscribable.

(2) Benefit your blog readers with more than just your charisma, personality quirks, and goofy products, unless that’s all you have…but those are not enough.

Gain new marketable skills, or test new open source software offerings and freeware network enhancements, that you can pass on to your readers who wish to have fun and succeed.

(3) Interact kindly with your blog community/family via rapid replies to comments and emails and Skypes and Google Chats.

(4) Provide state of the art widgets, as deemed appropriate and effective, without distracting, bewildering, or seeming too techy: polls, custom search engines, online games, digital art, staff photos, company picnic video, audio CEO welcome message, mascot chatbot for the kids (like “subservient chicken” or “toby” but way way better), RSS/Atom feed URLs displayed and subscription mechanisms, web contact/feedback forms upfront, upfront Contact and About pages, relevant link lists, podcast links, Odeo podcast creation mechnanism…

…provide fun, interesting, provocative, wild, cool, hip, entertaining, educational, fun, easy, easier, easiest, fastest INTERACTIVE doodads, amigo!

more on Web 2.0-ready blogs next time, friends!